Port Douglas Queensland

The tour called ‘Port Douglas in Style” caught my eye, and we were met at the Marina where Pacific Dawn was moored out at sea, by a Hummer which is a long, stretch Limousine. This one was complete with luxurious padded velvet seats and Champagne.

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Everyone was fitted in and we leisurely drove through Port Douglas town seeing some very beautiful treed streets as we headed out towards Mosman and Shannonvale

Port Douglas is a town in Far North QueenslandAustralia, approximately 70 km (40 mi) north of Cairns. Its permanent population was 3,205 at the time of the 2011 census.[2] The town’s population can often double, however, with the influx of tourists during the peak tourism season May–September. The town is named in honour of former Premier of Queensland, John Douglas. Port Douglas developed quickly based on the mining industry

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Port_Douglas

When the Kuranda Railway from Cairns to Kuranda was completed in 1891, the importance of Port Douglas dwindled along with its population. A cyclone in 1911 which demolished all but two buildings in the town also had a significant impact.[5] At its nadir in 1960 the town, by then little more than a fishing village, had a population of 100.

In the late-1980s, tourism boomed in the region after investor Christopher Skase financed the construction of the Sheraton Mirage Port Douglas Resort.

Skase’s Legacy is street after street in Port Douglas lined with magnificent palm trees that he purchased fully grown and had planted. However, he is not remembered for this, despite the fact that the trees are prominent and form a major part of Port Douglas’s beauty because he relinquished payment for his investment….long memories of those not paid for their services, despite the fact that the trees remain, and so does the Resort.

 

Shannonvale River and picnic spot was very beautiful….someone wanted to go to the toilet so that was the end of the exploring around the river, which was picturesque and lined with trees overgrown with creepers and rainforest plants…It is a bathing spot suitable for swimming….and photographs

Out came the purple umbrella…and away we went on our way…past the Shannonvale Winery which I would have loved to visit….to Mosman and forward    http://www.hummersandharleys.com.au/

https://www.shannonvalewine.com.au/  Passionfruit vineyards edge the road …grapes do not grow well in this area and wines are being made with tropical fruits and the passionfruit vineyards edge the road and were were very beautiful..

I am not too sure why we went to Cooya Beach as there was hardly any beach there….and the coconut trees that lined the beach as we drove there were beautiful…the weather was getting cloudy and we could barely see the cruise ship hanging out there on the horizon. It was the place to take some group photos…and then it was back to the Marina and the cruise ship..

Cooya Beach is a coastal suburb near the mouth of the Mossman River, 7 km north west of Port Douglas. The origin of its name is not recorded.

A township plan and formal naming were approved in 1963, but development awaited a further 30 years. Planning approvals and development proposals for a resort and a small shopping centre occurred in the mid-2000s

http://queenslandplaces.com.au/cooya-beach

Although Cooya Beach might seem to be a retirement haven, it is also an out-of-town suburb for working families and has a long-day care centre. At the 2011 census Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders made up 24% of the population. Recreational activities include mud-crabbing and boating.

Barron Falls Queensland

I was expecting to see Barron Falls overloading water with many waterfalls. Alas!! I was not lucky, and got the usual trickle of water…beautiful but not as expected

Instead of paying the usual $159 from the Cruise ship, I went with my friend via Public Transport as this time Pacific Dawn was moored out in the sea at Yorkeys Knob, a place that is not easily accessed from anywhere. I walked about 10 minutes to the end of the street and waited for Bus 212 that comes every hour to Smithfield.  From there at 11 50 am there was a bus to Kuranda….we walked through the shopping Centre and across the main road and the bus was $3.40. From Kuranda we took a Ride Share Car that cost $12..

The Ride Share took us to the Parking area at Barron Falls and from there we meandered along some paths through some very beautiful Rain forest to the Main viewing area for the Falls……

https://www.skyrail.com.au/webcam/barronfalls

Cairns Rainforest Webcam – Barron Falls

The Cairns Tropical Rainforest webcam is located on the top of Tower 25, adjacent to Skyrail’s Barron Falls Station and points in a West-North-West direction overlooking the Barron Falls and Gorge. There is a 125-watt solar panel supplying the camera and modem. A daylight sensor is installed to shut down the camera and modem at night to conserve power. The video stream runs on demand wirelessly through the cellular network

We walked down to where the Railway stops to share the view of the Barron Falls…and then back to the top and where we started from.

The Barron Falls may be viewed and accessed by road via the Kennedy Highway that crosses the Barron River upstream of the falls, near Kuranda. The narrow-gauge Kuranda Scenic Railway and the Skyrail aerial tram also leads from the coastal plain to the tablelands. The train stops at Barron Falls overlook, where passengers may disembark for several minutes. The Skyrail stops at two rainforest mid-stations, Red Peak and Barron Falls. The trail at Barron Falls Skyrail station leads through the rainforest to three separate lookouts providing views of the Gorge and Falls        https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Barron_Falls 

Airlies Beach Queensland

Cruise Ship Pacific Dawn arrives at Airlie’s Beach. I decide I should go on shore to see Airlie’s Beach. There was a shuttle bus that would take passengers to a market and I understood a small tour for $5 and along with other passengers I took the bus.

It was a very short drive from the Marina up the road to where a market was located. I got off the bus walked across the road, and walked back to the bus and returned to the Cruise Ship. There was really nothing to see, no view points, a driver who was not interested in his passengers, and as the large ferry was waiting I went back on that one…a choppy ride back to the ship. I am not quite sure why we came to Airlie Beach at all.

Hotels3-star averaging $133, 5-star averaging $218. View hotels
Weather29°C, Wind SE at 21 km/h, 59% Humidity
Location1,123 km (698 mi) from Brisbane; 151 km (94 mi) from Mackay; 25 km (16 mi) from Proserpine
Population1,208 (2016 census)

Cairns Foreshore

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We walked through Cairns, then onto the newly developed Beach and foreshore where backpackers were enjoying sunbathing in the grass under the shady trees. Walking on past the pool, there is a wall that separates the beach from the muddy banks and sea that was the original Cairns before this added beach.  http://www.cairnsattractions.com.au/explore/family-attractions/cairns-esplanade-lagoon-attractions.395.html

The tide was out and the mud banks were there, but this was full of birds enjoying the bounty from the sea, and also the sea life that is their food. There were gulls, waders, many pelicans and other birds, also birdwatchers with their cameras and stands all ready to take their bird photos and look knowledgeable.

One of the most internationally famous locations is the Cairns Esplanade, the long park along the coast of the city that forms the city waterfront. The beach is mostly mud, actually something of a recent development caused by the complex effects of dredging the harbour. But the mud has allowed great areas of mangrove to grow and also provides a great wintering site for migrant shorebirds from the northern hemisphere. The mud isn’t so great for classical tourism, but the beach was always something of a non-starter because of the stingers and saltwater crocodiles. Today the interests of tourists are met by an artificial sea pool near the city centre, and the muddy beach is left mostly for the birds.   http://www.10000birds.com/cairns-esplanade.htm    http://www.10000birds.com/cairns-esplanade.htm

Canon Ball Tree in Cairns

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https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Couroupita_guianensis

it is cultivated in many other tropical areas throughout the world because of its beautiful, fragrant flowers and large, interesting fruits.[4] There are medicinal uses for many parts of Couroupita guianensis

This tree was in the parkland by the foreshore at Cairns…now planted with amazing trees and plants.

The name of this glorious tree is very indicative of the characteristics it displays. Popularly referred to as the ‘cannonball tree’ because not only are the fruits as large, round and heavy as their namesakes, but when falling to the earth, they often do so with loud and explosive noises. 

Perhaps the curiosity provoked by this strange tree comes from the fact that the fruit appears to be developing straight from the trunk of the tree as opposed to normal fruit trees like the apple, but also in that the fruit has a truly awful stench to it, unlike the flowers. These too, are extremely odd, developing in enormous bunches of up to twelve feet long, and are very brightly colored with strong, sweet scented blooms.

Miyajima Ferry

http://jr-miyajimaferry.co.jp/en

Great Torii ferry services, which take you closest to the Great Torii, operate from Miyajima-guchi from 9:10 a.m. to 4:10 p.m.
JR Miyajima Ferry lets you enjoy a front view of Itsukushima Shrine through the Great Torii,
and take photos of these two notable features together from the sea. The Great Torii is well worth a view from the sea.