stingless jellyfish…many float the waters of the islands

jellyfish

http://www.aqua.org/explore/baltimore/exhibits-experiences/jellies-invasion

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Blue Blubber Jelly

The blue blubber jelly actually ranges in color from white to light blue to dark purple. Its bell pulses in a distinctive, staccato-like rhythm.

In Asia this venomous jelly is considered a delicacy…

The blue blubber jelly actually ranges in color from white to light blue to dark purple. Its bell pulses in a distinctive, staccato-like rhythm.

This venomous jelly can be safely eaten once it’s been correctly dried and processed. Dried jellies are popular in many Asian countries, especially Japan, where they’re considered a culinary delicacy. The texture is reportedly crispy, yet elastic—hence the name “rubber band salad” for a dish sold in China. The Chinese believe eating jellies will reduce high blood pressure

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http://www.aqua.org/explore/animals/jellyfish-blue-blubber-jelly

The blue blubber’s bell can be up to 16 inches wide.

They eat Plankton

They live in the Coastal waters of eastern and northern Australia.

In the past, jelly populations were kept in check by predators like sea turtles and jelly-eating fish. Due to the reduction of their predators, jelly populations are growing at alarming rates.

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Sea turtles and other jelly-eating animals, such as tuna, sunfish, butterfish, and spiny dogfish, keep the jelly populations in balance. All seven species of sea turtles include them in their diets. The largest sea turtle species, the leatherback, depends on jellies for food. Because jellies are more than 90% water and an adult leatherback can weigh more than 2,000 pounds, one turtle can consume a lot of jellies!

Blue blubbers often come to us with tiny symbiotic copepods that eat dead tissue off the jelly and usually don’t harm the animal, as long as it is healthy. However, if the animal’s delicate tissue rips even slightly, the copepods begin to feast on the jelly, often leading to its demise. The aquarists work diligently to keep these copepods to a minimum

Last night..15 Jan 2012 was the second highest neap, which also means the lowest low tide. Lamb Island Point had a very high tide which must have brought many jellyfish closer to the shore. When the tide receded quickly, they were caught on the rocks by the mangroves.

Today there were many jellyfish lying on the rocks.

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At night you can see them around the jetty glowing in the dark.

Today they are lying on the rocks ‘melting’ as they lie there.

I took this video of a jellyfish swimming in the shallow rock pool yesterday

Marguerite Carstairs http://youtu.be/EmbTBbec2gM

www.youtube.comStranded by the low tide, the jellyfish tries to swim as the tide comes in and fills up the place he is in https://sunrisetoday.wordpress.com/

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