Cultural Trail … Bronzes..King George Square Brisbane

The Cultural Heritage Trail is a 1.3 kilometre walk through the city’s historic plazas and squares, with a focus on artworks and memorials that commemorate Brisbane’s history. The trail commences at King George Square and finishes at St Stephen’s Cathedral on Elizabeth Street. It is a mix of historic, heritage-listed and contemporary artworks and monuments, each contributing to Brisbane’s story.

The design of the King George V bronze equestrian statue with its two lions, was the result of an Australian wide competition.

The design of the King George V bronze equestrian statue with its two lions, was the result of an Australian wide competition.

Lions King George Square

The lions are of the type described as ‘lion couchant’, lying down with the head raised. The lion is a common symbol in heraldry and is particularly prominent in British heraldry.

The Lion  symbolises many things including bravery, valour, strength and royalty. The lion is also recognised as a national symbol of the British people.

The two bronze lions were originally part of the King George V Memorial and signified the then perceived might of the British Empire. In the 1930s their original position could be interpreted to represent both royalty and the British people, in its widest Commonwealth sense.

Petrie Tableau

Petrie Tableau..

The Petrie Tableau was commissioned and created in 1988 as a way to acknowledge the pioneer families of Brisbane. Initially known as the Brisbane City Bicentennial Statue, the competition was launched in May 1987 and was an endorsed and funded Bicentennial Project. Tasmanian sculptor Stephen Walker received the commission to undertake the work.

The selection of the Petrie family as the principal subject was a result of considerable public submissions. The Petrie family were the first free settlers in the Moreton Bay Penal Colony after Andrew Petrie was appointed clerk of works in 1837. After the closure of the penal settlement, the Petrie family remained in Queensland and played an integral role in the design and construction of many of Brisbane’s earliest buildings

The Petrie Tableau was commissioned and created in 1988 as a way to acknowledge the pioneer families of Brisbane. Initially known as the Brisbane City Bicentennial Statue, the competition was launched in May 1987 and was an endorsed and funded Bicentennial Project. Tasmanian sculptor Stephen Walker received the commission to undertake the work.

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The design of the King George V bronze equestrian statue with its two lions.

Originally the King stood on a central pillar, flanked by the lions which faced to the sides. In 1938 the statuary group was placed in Albert Square with a street separating it from City Hall.

The king originally faced City Hall, however in the early 1970s the statue was turned around to majestically lead his subjects to battle, after Queen Elizabeth II asked during a visit to Brisbane, “Why is Grandpapa retreating?” The lions are similar to those placed on radial pedestals at the base of Nelson’s column in Trafalgar Square, London.

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On George St, between Adelaide St and Ann St, there are some kangaroo sculptures made out of scrap metal  by Christopher Trotter in 1988. He has been creating artworks for government, councils, universities and developers since 1994. Trotter’s sculptures, each of which is unique, includes the City Roos in George Street, Brisbane. The City Roos sculptures were made by Trotter, beginning in 1999, from scrapmetal from a broad cross-section of industries.

The scrap metal ‘roos are the result of a recent push by the Brisbane City Council for what they call “public art”–art that, instead of living in an art gallery, lives out on the streets among the people. Cr David Hinchcliffe, chairperson of the council’s Community Policy Committee (which also oversees public art), has said of them: “The most popular public art we’ve ever been responsible for are those kangaroos on George Street.

http://www.furry.org.au/kangaroos/art/scrap/scrap-roos.html

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_public_art_in_Brisbane

 

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http://www.brisbane.qld.gov.au/facilities-recreation/sports-leisure/walking/walking-trails/public-art-trails/cultural-heritage-public-art-trail

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