Mangroves on the Wetlands….Southern Moreton Bay Islands

IMG_0013

A total of 19 plant formations occur on the tidal wetlands. Six of those formations are dominated by the
mangrove Avicennia marina. Climatic conditions in Moreton Bay provide optimum temperatures of 18-
24 degrees for the growth of Avicennia marina for six to seven months of the year. Behind the fringing
mangroves, salt-marsh is usually zoned parallel to the shoreline and consists of three plant communities
broadly classified as:
• shrublands, the dominant species being Sarcocornia spp. and Suaeda australis
• sedge (Juncus krausii) and rush swamps
• grasslands (Sporobolus virginicus) as well as bare salt pans.

You can access this information via RAMSAR    https://rsis.ramsar.org/RISapp/files/RISrep/AU631RIS.pdf

IMG_0019
Seven species of mangroves are found in Moreton Bay and major areas of mangroves are located
throughout the Bay and in particular along the Pimpama River, Coomera River, North Arm and the
wetlands and waterways of McCoys Creek and Woogoompah Creek. Mangroves are the nursery areas
and ultimate source of food for many commercial and recreational fish species and are necessary for the
prevention of erosion, the provision of habitat, landscape value and to provide roosting areas for wildlife
(Arthington and Hegerl, 1988).

You can access this information via RAMSAR     https://rsis.ramsar.org/RISapp/files/RISrep/AU631RIS.pdf

IMG_0061

Advertisements