Kopan Monastery Nepal

http://www.kopanmonastery.com/

Kopan Monastery is a center for Buddhist study, meditation, retreat., and practice. It is nestled in the foothills of the Himalayas, in the Kathmandu valley in Nepal.

It was established in the late 1960’s by Lama Yeshe and Lama Zopa Rinpoche as a home for monks and nuns from the Himalayan area and foreigners wishing to receive teachings.

This is still the mission of Kopan monastery today: preserve and transmit the Tibetan Buddhist tradition as the path to ultimate happiness and freedom from suffering to all.

Kopan provides integrated education through which people’s minds and hearts can be transformed into their highest potential for the benefit of others, inspired by an attitude of universal responsibility. We are committed to creating harmonious environments and helping all beings develop their full potential of infinite wisdom and compassion.

Kopan is a peaceful, calm and relaxing place to spend a few hours, days or weeks.

You are welcome to be part of this community as a guest.

Develop the mind of equilibrium.
You will always be getting praise and blame,
but do not let either affect the poise of the mind:
follow the calmness, the absence of pride.
Buddha Shakyamuni
meditation hall 1
The Lama Tsong Khapa Gompa

The main gompa in the entrance courtyard is the first thing you see as you come through the gate. The morning prayers of the monks are held in here and you are welcome to sit in on these.  The courtyard in front is the debate court yard with the debate house on the side. Here the philosophy students hold their debating session’s morning and evening.  It is fascinating to watch a debate, seemingly a chaotic shouting session, which in reality is a well coordinating exchange of argument against counter argument on a particular subject. The main figure in the middle of the altar is lama Tsong Khapa, Tibetan saint and founder of the Gelug tradition. There many statues on either side. On the left side, around the statue of Shakyamuni Buddha collection many Tibetan texts, mainly the Kangyur, which is a collection of all the teachings of Shakyamuni Buddha, and also the Tengyur, which is a collection of commentaries on these teachings.

Advertisements