Couran Resort Stradbroke Island Queensland

http://build.tripod.lycos.com/trellix/sitebuilder/f_edit_page.html

The trip starts with a one hour boat ride on the Resort’s own ‘Big Cat’  which is a fabulous looking
vessel from Marina Mirage which is on the  Gold Coast. Here you take off from the elegant Marina Mirage, located
next to the 6 star Palazzo Versace, past coves and side  beaches until you get to the Island.
You are formally met and greeted and taken as a group to a point where you are given your room package.
The accommodation is reasonable…mine was a room with all the facilities overlooking the front garden
where the wallabies graze at dawn and dusk. All rooms overlook this front garden rich with Paper bark gums and tropical
foliages.
The restaurant is within the huge luxury pool complex  complete with a
swim-in bar. There are chairs and umbrellas  and small relaxing areas for privacy. It is very elegant and well
designed. The restaurant has very reasonably priced  meals..continental breakfast was $5.00.
The resort Bus goes to the  surf each with views across to the Gold Coast twice a day  and is free for guests. The bus stop is possibly the most stunning bus  stop in the world…sea eagles behind, GoldCoast  skyline before, and the sand are full of Pipis which I collected and  took to the chef and for $7.00 he cooked me a feast for  my dinner.
It is a very private beach if you are into free sun bathing or total privacy…and the sands are soft and white and the beach virtually people free for 22 kms. Between the beach and the Resort are marshes resplendent with cabbage Palms
and beautiful river gums. This is truly a photographers paradise.

See my photos on webshots: <a href="http://Community.webshots.com/user/ladymaggichttp://Community.webshots.com/user/ladymaggic</

Lord Howe island Australia

http://www.lorhiti.com/

Lorhiti – an oasis of seclusion in one of the best locations on Lord Howe Island, Lorhiti is the closest resort to stunning Ned’s Beach and only minutes from shops, post office, cafes, restaurants, all beaches, tours and attractions.

Stroll a few minutes from your verandah, along our private track, through magnificent banyan and palm groves to the brilliant white sand and crystal clear waters of Ned’s Beach where you can hand feed tame fish in barefoot bliss. Slip into the water for a snorkel where you’ll find over 500 species of fish including clown fish and wrasse providing spectacular underwater colour.


Fragrant frangipani and splashy hibiscus blooms colour the lush 4 acre tropical gardens that surround our six private, self contained, one bedroom apartments. Our exotic gardens are home to many native birds and provide a beautiful backdrop from your private verandah. From here you can greet the crystal morning with an outdoor breakfast and at the end of the day relax and soak up the serenity.

Once you arrive at Lorhiti you will forget the bustling mainland lifestyle and be immersed in the tranquility, with only the sounds of singing birds, the breeze in the rainforest and the sea waves. Lorhiti is well known as a quiet, secluded retreat, well situated away from the roads and close to all amenities. Peace and privacy are paramount at our boutique property – most visitors stay a week or more and many come back again, year after year!

Flooded Gympie, Maryborough and Queensland

The rains poured down from Tweed Heads through to Maryborough.
I stayed overnight at Stotts Island, but fully expected the rains to continue, so packed up the wet van, and drove off at sunrise.
At Gympie, the Bruce Highway was blocked at Kybong, but when I went through at 7am, the waters were down but after the recent rain, they were rising. At Gympie, a detour took me across the river. The free camps were under water, and at Tiara, there were two caravans on high ground like an island, and the road was flooded. I had planed to stay there, but drove on.
I tried to go home via Hervey Bay route but Maryborough was blocked, so I returned via Bruce Highway and the Childers road, and the rain cleared before the Howard turnoff. I stopped at the truck park next to the Caltex, and opened up the van, had coffee and toast and waited until the canvas dried. I was lucky.

Now both towns are flooded…so I was lucky that I drove through so early in the morning.
It was sunny at Burrum Heads…

http://bigpondnews.com/articles/National/2011/01/09/Flash_flooding_warning_for_Qld_562283.html

Police Chief Superintendent Alistair Dawson said there had been overnight flash flooding near Gympie and Maryborough in the southeast and sudden inundations are expected elsewhere.

The Mary River at Gympie is still rising and threatens 20 businesses in the city.

At Maryborough the river is predicted to rise to 8.4 metres – under the predicted 9m – and has inundated three homes and three businesses.

Boat owners in the Mary River are being asked to check their vessels after problems at the local marina and other anchorages.

In Rockhampton, central Queensland, 138 people remain in evacuation centres.

‘Sadly, 400 homes still have water through the actual premises themselves,’ Supt Dawson said.

About 150 businesses are also affected, he said.

The Fitzroy River is holding steady and the Bruce Highway north is open.

Beaches at Byron Bay Queensland Australia

http://www.byron-bay.com/byronbay/beachguide.html

Byron’s beaches are like a dream come true, which sounds like a cliché
until you experience them. If Australia does one thing really well, it
has to be the beaches, and Byron’s are among the best in Australia.
Stretching between the headlands of the northern New South Wales coast,
many are sheltered from the southerlies and offer great surf breaks.
Clean and undeveloped, the beaches are not overcrowded with high-rises,
or in fact with buildings of any sort.

Here, where the Coral Sea to the north meets the Tasman Sea in the
south, Cape Byron protrudes into the Pacific Ocean and forms the most
easterly point of the Australian mainland. Dramatic views from the
headland are your reward for walking to the lighthouse (you can drive,
but it takes the drama out of the scenery, and it will cost you $6 to
park your car). From the Cape you will see stunning views over the Bay
to Mt Warning and the Border Ranges, or south over Tallow Beach to
Broken Head in the distance.

It may be a surprise, but Cape Byron is not all sand and surf. If you
walk up Lee Lane from the Captain Cook lookout (off Lighthouse Road) you
will find yourself in littoral (coastal) rainforest, with banksias,
Bangalow palms, cabbage palms and melaleuca species. Emerging from the
rainforest, you’ll be rewarded by a wonderful view to the south along
Tallow Beach and maybe by hang-gliders taking off from the wooden
platform.

A few more hundred metres and you come past the historic lighthouse cottages, to the lighthouse itself (www.lighthouse.net.au)
and then down the path to the extreme easterly point. Continue down
the hill to Little Watego’s and Watego’s beaches and back along the
paths to Byron Bay. You will almost certainly see pods of bottlenose
dolphins from up here, and possibly rays and sea turtles.

In the appropriate seasons, Cape Byron is one of the best vantage points
for whale-watching. From the end of June to August, the huge mammals
migrate northwards to calve in the warm northern waters. Then, in
September and October, they return with their new babies, sometimes
stopping in the Bay for some whale R&R and to teach the young ones
‘breaching’ and ‘slapping’. Most whale sightings are of humpbacks,
distinctive by their spinal shape, but it’s also possible to see other
species.

However, back to the beaches. Gleaming white tiny-grained sand and clear
turquoise-blue water only occasionally sullied by the debris of storms
are what you can expect in Byron. Sometimes after a strong northerly
wind ‘cornflakes’ – scraps of floating seaweed – appear in the waves,
turning them a greenish-brown rather than the usual aquamarine. But
nearly all year round, the water and the beaches invite luxurious
sunbathing and clean swimming.

Byron Shire offers over 30km of beaches, from the busy, patrolled (in
summer) beaches near the town, to isolated coves, nudist and
dog-friendly beaches within 10-15 minutes drive. Ranging in temperature
from around 18°C in the winter to 26°C in the summer, the water is
perfect for most of the year, and only slightly chilly in winter. All
year round, wear a hat and high-rating sunscreen as, even in winter, the
Australian sun burns

Beaches at Byron Bay Queensland Australia

http://www.byron-bay.com/byronbay/beachguide.html

Byron’s beaches are like a dream come true, which sounds like a cliché
until you experience them. If Australia does one thing really well, it
has to be the beaches, and Byron’s are among the best in Australia.
Stretching between the headlands of the northern New South Wales coast,
many are sheltered from the southerlies and offer great surf breaks.
Clean and undeveloped, the beaches are not overcrowded with high-rises,
or in fact with buildings of any sort.

Here, where the Coral Sea to the north meets the Tasman Sea in the
south, Cape Byron protrudes into the Pacific Ocean and forms the most
easterly point of the Australian mainland. Dramatic views from the
headland are your reward for walking to the lighthouse (you can drive,
but it takes the drama out of the scenery, and it will cost you $6 to
park your car). From the Cape you will see stunning views over the Bay
to Mt Warning and the Border Ranges, or south over Tallow Beach to
Broken Head in the distance.

It may be a surprise, but Cape Byron is not all sand and surf. If you
walk up Lee Lane from the Captain Cook lookout (off Lighthouse Road) you
will find yourself in littoral (coastal) rainforest, with banksias,
Bangalow palms, cabbage palms and melaleuca species. Emerging from the
rainforest, you’ll be rewarded by a wonderful view to the south along
Tallow Beach and maybe by hang-gliders taking off from the wooden
platform.

A few more hundred metres and you come past the historic lighthouse cottages, to the lighthouse itself (www.lighthouse.net.au)
and then down the path to the extreme easterly point. Continue down
the hill to Little Watego’s and Watego’s beaches and back along the
paths to Byron Bay. You will almost certainly see pods of bottlenose
dolphins from up here, and possibly rays and sea turtles.

In the appropriate seasons, Cape Byron is one of the best vantage points
for whale-watching. From the end of June to August, the huge mammals
migrate northwards to calve in the warm northern waters. Then, in
September and October, they return with their new babies, sometimes
stopping in the Bay for some whale R&R and to teach the young ones
‘breaching’ and ‘slapping’. Most whale sightings are of humpbacks,
distinctive by their spinal shape, but it’s also possible to see other
species.

However, back to the beaches. Gleaming white tiny-grained sand and clear
turquoise-blue water only occasionally sullied by the debris of storms
are what you can expect in Byron. Sometimes after a strong northerly
wind ‘cornflakes’ – scraps of floating seaweed – appear in the waves,
turning them a greenish-brown rather than the usual aquamarine. But
nearly all year round, the water and the beaches invite luxurious
sunbathing and clean swimming.

Byron Shire offers over 30km of beaches, from the busy, patrolled (in
summer) beaches near the town, to isolated coves, nudist and
dog-friendly beaches within 10-15 minutes drive. Ranging in temperature
from around 18°C in the winter to 26°C in the summer, the water is
perfect for most of the year, and only slightly chilly in winter. All
year round, wear a hat and high-rating sunscreen as, even in winter, the
Australian sun burns

Byron Bay Lighthouse

Standing on a bald rocky headland with a precipitous cliff on the east
side, and a sheer drop of approximately 100 metres, Cape Byron
Lighthouse is the most easterly light in Australia, and one of the most
powerful.

Built in the style used by NSW colonial architect, James Barnet, Charles
Harding his successor, prepared the plans for the Cape Byron
Lighthouse. Due to the elevation of the site, a tall structure was not
required. Construction began in 1899 with the levelling of the site by
contractors, Mitchell and King. The total cost was £10,042 (pounds) to
the contractors, £8,000 for the apparatus and lantern house, and £2,600
for the road from Byron Bay township.

Tower Construction
The tower is constructed from concrete blocks made on the ground, lifted
and cemented into position and finally cement rendered inside and out.
This technique saved erecting framework.

The Lens
The eight ton optical lens was made by the French company, Societe des
Establishment, Henry Lepante, Paris. It is a dioptric first-order
bivalve double flashing lens and contains 760 pieces of highly polished
prismatic glass. The lens revolves on a bath of 7cwt mercury. The
original illuminant was a concentric six-wick kerosene burner. This was
replaced in 1922 by a vaporised kerosene mantle burner, which increased
the intensity from 145,000 cp to 500,000 cp. In 1956, the light was
converted to mains electricity increasing the intensity to 2,200,000 cd.

The original lens weight driven mechanism, which works on a similar
principle as that of a grandfather clock, was also replaced with an
electric drive motor when the light was converted to electric operation.
An auxiliary fixed red light is exhibited from the tower to cover
Julian Rocks to the north.

The Event
The installation of the lighthouse was regarded as a great event in the
district of Byron Bay. A banquet was arranged and special trains carried
visitors from Lismore and Murwillumbah for the opening. The Premier of
the day, the Hon. John See (later Sir John See), was accompanied by a
number of his colleagues who left Sydney in the Government steamer
‘Victoria’. However, bad weather prevented the vessel from arriving on
time, and when the party should have been banqueting the steamer was
some thirty miles away. She arrived in the bay just before midnight on
30 November 1901, but again, the weather made it impossible for the
party to land until dawn.

The Lighthouse Opened
After landing, the party was informed that the banquet had taken place
on the previous evening, and the necessary toast had been heartily drunk
in the absence of the Premier and his party. Mr See, after making an
acrobatic performance in landing, was cordially cheered, and later
formally welcomed at the Great Northern Hotel. Interestingly, the
lighthouse was christened with a rich and sumptuous vintage burgundy –
not dashed against the tower to waste, but sipped by the ladies and
legislators to compensate for having missed all the good things of the
banquet held the night before.

Visit our Cape Byron Headland Reserve page for more information on the Cape.

Courtesy Cape Byron Trust

Toll Gates through Brisbane and Queensland

https://www.govia.com.au/via/home/Contact+us/Contact+us

There is mo toll gate from here to the Airport, then there is one on the Gold Coast Direction.
That costs $4.60.
There is another toll further south depending on the route taken.

The system in Queensland is that one phones and makes a booking. I took a month’s pass.
Then when one goes through the toll gate it registers and the amount is taken from your credit card.
Its a good system as long as you are aware you cannot pay tolls at the gates and have to register.
If you have not registered then you need to phone them again and make the payment

Options for contacting go via

      Phone 13000 GO VIA [1 3000 46 842] Seven days a week – 7.00 am to 10.00 pm.

      Fax  1 300 55 99 20

      Post  PO Box 2125 Mansfield Q 4122

      Email  enquiries@govia.com.au

Queensland flood waters affect 22 cities the area size of NSW..and neighbors help to neighbors

http://bigpondnews.com/articles/TopStories/2011/01/03/Qld_flood_water_affect_22_cities_towns_559393.html

With 22 cities and towns already affected by floodwaters in
Queensland, covering an area the size of New South Wales, there are
warnings the state could remain waterlogged for a month.

And
following the death of a 41-year-old Mt Isa woman,who drowned when her
car was swept into a river, police are again warning of the dangers of
attempting to cross or enter the floodwaters.

Emergency service
officials held a disaster management meeting in Brisbane yesterday
where acting commissioner Alistair Dawson warned Queensland could be
flood affected for a month.

Police say they’ll decide today if
they’ll continue their air, land and water search for a swimmer who was
reported missing in Rockhampton’s Fitzroy River early yesterday.

Authorities say 40 per cent of the city could be affected by the flood peak of 9.4 metres on Wednesday.

Meanwhile,
Bundaberg is moving on to the recovery stage after its worst flooding
in 40 years, and the flood waters are also receding in the central
Queensland city of Emerald, but it remains divided by the swollen Nogoa
River.

In private homes problems arise as well....

My unit in the caravan park was not lived in when I was away and the man next door started using my grassed area for his parking.

This created Tyre tracks, and I asked him not to park his car there, so it could dry out.

When the rains were over-flooding the back road and pouring into the gardens, my nice neighbour dug an angular ditch that not only drained his excess water, but also all the water from the road making my lower area a bog-pond. I told the caravan park about this and was told to fill it in. I did with a pot-plant and 3 bricks, so at least the water flow would be curbed. He retaliated by removing my filling and making the whole ditch deeper and wider, and bow all the waters have drained into my grass and its stale water and a bog.

The voice of a woman is weak, and I have either to accept that my area will stay a bog, or move away.

I am still angry because of the theft of all my pot-plants and purchased plants, including herbs and orchids by the neighbors and the man I asked to water the garden in my 3 month absence. Again, there is nothing I can do because,’they thought I was not returning’.

No plants and now a bog that is getting larger as the waters continue to drain into what was my garden..

Now the small grassed area and the back yard plants, which they did not steal, is dying because of draining stagnant water.

The effects of the flood affect people in different ways. I am
grateful that I still have my unit, but angry with the mentality of
Trailer residents which I now see as something out of ‘Deliverance’ with
frog-pond characteristics
. all croaking about their own little lives and sleep-holes, and taking what they can find like dung beetles in cow-pads.

Springbrrringbrook National Park

http://www.derm.qld.gov.au/parks/springbrook/index.html

Spectacular waterfalls, lush rainforest, ancient trees, impressive views, exceptional ecological importance and natural beauty make this World Heritage-listed park an oustanding place to visit.

Camping in Springbrook National Park

There is one campground, The Settlement, with tent camping beside your car in well-defined sites. Space for camper trailers and campervans is available. As this is a newly established campground, please be aware that the vegetation does not yet provide shade or screening from the road.

Campground features: The Settlement is a new campground. At present it is very open, with no shade or screening from the road. Native shrubs and trees have been planted and these will soon provide screening and shade.

Location: On Carricks Road, linked by a short walking track to the top of Purling Brook Falls. This walking track links up to the Gold Coast Hinterland Great Walk.

Access: The campground can be reached by conventional vehicle.

Number of sites: 11 well-defined, numbered sites.

Campsites are suitable for: tents, camper trailers and campervans. Each campsite has a well grassed area approximately 10 m in diameter and an individual parking bay. Numbered sites 1–4 have longer parking bays (approx. 8 m x 4.2 m) that could accommodate a camper trailer however the grassed area is partially separated from the parking bay by bollards—see campsite photo. Sites 5–11 are for tent based camping only. See The Settlement campground map (link provided above).

Campsite surface: Grassed area with gravel parking bays.

Facilities: Toilets, drinking water and a cooking shelter with free electric barbecues. Please note that showers are not provided. Across Carricks Road is a large open recreation area, information shelter, picnic facilities and additional toilets.

kouklahouse.wordpress.com/

Just back from an Easter trip to Carnarvon Gorge, central QLD, Australia

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